InDesign’s automatic page numbers work well enough, but what about special cases? Some documents require pages to be omitted from total page counts. Other documents use several different systems. Sometimes section numbers or special codes must be included. Well, don’t start typing in those numbers manually, because InDesign can handle it—and quite gracefully, too.

To save the list style to a template so you can use it with other documents, select the list in the document. Access the Multilevel List dropdown and choose Define New List Style. Enter a descriptive new and select the New documents based on this template (at the bottom). Once you click OK, the multilevel list style will be available in all new documents.
Let’s say you want to use roman numerals for the introductory pages, arabic numbers for the main body and lowercase letters for the closing pages. Each of these formats can be selected in the Page Numbering Format dialog box. First, position the insertion point where you want to start using a different page number format. Choose Format > Page > Numbering. In the Page Numbering Format list box, select a format, and then choose OK to insert the page number.
You’ll be gathering several InDesign documents into one Book file to create a book. If you’re just getting started on your chapters, it’s best to design one of your more complex chapters first, then use that chapter as a template for all the remaining ones (i.e., “Save As” Chapter 1, delete all the original chapter’s text, place the Chapter 1 text, and thereby leave the trim size, margins, and styles intact and consistent among all chapters).
First thing we need to do, is we need to jump to page 1. So double click page 1, so we know we're on it. Right click page no.1, and we need to go to this option that says 'Numbering & Section Options'. Click on him. And what we do is, we say, I want to switch it from style 1, 2, 3 to A, B, C. Actually you pick any of these in here. It's really typical to use A, B, C, but you can use any of these other numbers, just click 'OK'. You'll notice that A, B, C, D, E is being replaced out. Now what we want to do is go to our first page that we want. In our case it's E. So I don't want this. Let's get rid of our Spreads. I don't want page 1, page C, or B. I don't want this to be page1, I want this to be page 1. So I'm going to double click page E. Right click it, go to 'Numbering & Sectioning'. And just say, I'd like to start at page no. 1 using this format. Click 'OK'. What will happen is, you can see, page 1 starts here, 2, 3, 4. You see, the numbering starts here as well. All the way through, to the end of our document.
In this video we're going to look at starting your page numbering, not from 1, you can see, we started A, B, C, D, and 1 actually starts on page 5. That means we can have a Contents page, and a Cover that don't get included in the page number. That's going to help us with a couple of things, like our Contents page. Otherwise our first bit of text is going to start on page 5. That's not true, it's on 1. It's kind of true. Anyway, let's go and look at setting out our page numbers.
This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.
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